National Asthma Resource Hub for EXHALE Strategies

Logo for the CDC EXHALE resource

CDC’s National Asthma Control Program (NACP) and its partners help people with asthma achieve better health and improved quality of life. NACP developed EXHALE, a set of six strategies that each contribute to better asthma control.
As a CDC partner, Allergy & Asthma Network has created this repository of resources. As it grows, we will add features to filter and sort resources by keywords, EXHALE strategy and resource type. This resource hub will serve as a central place where health care professionals, asthma coalitions, state asthma programs and others will find evidence-based resources to use with the populations they serve.

The repository includes resources contributed by Allergy & Asthma Network as well as those by state asthma control programs. This repository will grow over time as more resources are added.

E

Education on asthma
self-management

X

X-tinguishing smoking and secondhand smoke

H

Home visits for trigger reduction and self-management education

A

Achieving asthma guidelines-based medical management

L

Linking and coordinating care across healthcare settings

E

Environmental policies and best practices to reduce indoor, outdoor and at-work asthma triggers

The EXHALE strategies have been developed by the CDC’s National Asthma Control Program.

Resources for Letter E of the CDC EXHALE Strategies: Education on Asthma Self-Management

This strategy can help to:

  • Educate people with asthma and their families on how to use asthma medications
  • Educate people on how to manage their condition when asthma symptoms worsen
  • Reduce exposures to asthma triggers

Education on asthma self-management can be delivered in a variety of settings, including clinics, emergency departments, hospitals, pharmacies, schools and homes.

Here are some helpful resources with links that coincide with this strategy:

Item NameAudience
A Provider’s Asthma Pre-Consultation ChecklistProviders
Asthma Management and ControlPersons with Asthma
Understanding Asthma – English VersionPersons with Asthma
Understanding Asthma – Spanish Edition (Digital Download)Persons with Asthma
What is Severe Asthma?Persons with Asthma
How to Use a Metered – Dose Inhaler (MDI)Persons with Asthma
What are Valved Holding Chambers and Spacers?Persons with Asthma
How to Use a Nebulizer MachinePersons with Asthma
AsthmaTracker Symptom Diary SystemPersons with Asthma
Asthma Action Plan for Home & SchoolSchool Nurses, Parents
Asthma Care at School Post COVID-19 OutbreakSchool Nurses
Welcome to Breatherville: Asthma and Allergies Learning Resources for ChildrenChildren, Parents
Asthma Is Not Stopping Me: Featuring Fabulous Me, Piper LeeChildren
Respiratory Tools (17 x 22)Providers, School
Respiratory Inhalers: Side by Side (33 x 17)Providers, School
Respiratory Treatments (11x8 ½)Providers, School
Resources in SpanishPatients and Providers

Resources for Letter X of the CDC EXHALE Strategies:
X-tinguishing Smoking and Exposure to Secondhand Smoke

National guidelines recommend that those with asthma avoid smoking and any exposure to secondhand smoke. 

 When exposure to smoking and secondhand smoke is reduced, it can:

  • Improve asthma control and lung function.
  • Reduce rescue medication use, emergency department visits and urgent office visits.

These resources can help you learn more about smoking cessation and secondhand smoke.

Item NameAudience
Breathe Easier: Smoking Facts and Cessation TipsPatients and Providers
Vaping: What We Need to KnowPatients and Providers
Can You Smoke If You Have AsthmaPatients and Providers
Considering COVID-19: E-cigarettes & Vaping with AsthmaPatients and Providers
Long-Term Use of E-Cigarettes Linked to Respiratory DiseasePatients and Providers
Quit SmokingPatients and Providers
What is Secondhand Smoke?Patients and Providers
Asthma and Secondhand SmokePatients and Providers
Secondhand SmokePatients and Providers
Tips from Former Smokers: Jessica S.'s Asthma Tip AdPatients and Providers
Nathan M: “I Never Smoked a Day In My Life!”Patients and Providers
Ellie N: Smoking and the LGBT CommunitiesPatients and Providers
Jamason C: “I Didn’t Know Why I Couldn’t Breathe”Patients and Providers
Learn about Quit Smoking MedicinesPatients and Providers
Five Reasons Why Calling a Quitline Can Be Key to Your SuccessPatients and Providers

Resources for Letter H of the CDC EXHALE Strategies: Home Visits for Trigger Reduction and Asthma
Self-Management Education

Services during a home visit include:

  • Assessments for common triggers of asthma attacks.
  • Education on correctly using asthma medication and how to control asthma symptoms.

Home visits can be provided by nurses, certified asthma educators and community health workers.

Item NameAudience
Breathe Better At Home (English)Patients and Providers
Breathe Better At Home (Spanish)Patients and Providers
Medikidz Vol 2: Explain AsthmaChildren
Medikidz Vol 3: Explain AsthmaChildren
Phoebe the Pug asks, “Is My Asthma Changing?”Children
Indoor AIRepair at Home, School and Play (English)Patient and Providers
Indoor AIRepair at Home, School & Play (Spanish)Patient and Providers
How Climate Change Affects AsthmaPatient and Providers
What are the Symptoms of AsthmaPatients
Spring 2021: High Risk Asthma & Allergy Season AheadPatients & Providers
DASHH ProgramChildren on Medicaid
DASHH ProgramOlder Adults on Medicaid
DASHH ProgramThose with high-risk asthma

Resources for Letter A of the CDC EXHALE Strategies:
Achievement of Guidelines-Based Medical Management Among People with Asthma

This strategy can help to: 

  • Educate people with asthma and their families on how to use asthma medications
  • Educate people on how to manage their condition when asthma symptoms worsen 
  • Reduce exposures to asthma triggers

Education on asthma self-management can be delivered in a variety of settings, including clinics, emergency departments, hospitals, pharmacies, schools and homes.

Here are some helpful resources with links that coincide with this strategy: 

ItemAudience
Asthma Medication & TreatmentPatients and Providers
Asthma Storylines AppPatients
What if I Can’t Afford My Asthma Medication?Patients
Asthma Management and ControlPatients
Severe AsthmaPatients
AsthmaTrackerPatients and Providers
Respiratory Inhalers (33x17)Providers
Respiratory Tools (17x22)Providers
Respiratory Treatments – EnglishProviders
Respiratory Treatments – EnglishProviders
Respiratory Treatments – SpanishProviders
Respiratory Treatments – EnglishProviders
A Provider’s Asthma Pre-Consultation ChecklistProviders
What is an Asthma Action Plan?Patients
Asthma Action Plan for Home & SchoolSchool Nurses
How Does Asthma Affect PregnancyPatients
Peter’s Perfect PipesChildren
Understanding Asthma – English VersionAdults
Understanding Asthma – Spanish Edition (Digital Download)Adults
Resources in SpanishPatients and Providers

Resources for Letter L of the CDC EXHALE Strategies:
Linkages and Coordination of Care Across Settings Among People with Asthma

This strategy of coordinated care links people to healthcare and social services. Improving linkages and coordinated care includes:

  • Quality improvement initiatives.
  • Patient-centered medical homes.
  • School or community-based programs.

Case management or disease management programs.

ItemAudience
Asthma Medication & TreatmentPatients and Providers
Asthma Storylines AppPatients
What if I Can’t Afford My Asthma Medication?Patients
Asthma Management and ControlPatients
Severe AsthmaPatients
AsthmaTrackerPatients and Providers
Respiratory Inhalers (33x17)Providers
Respiratory Tools (17x22)Providers
Respiratory Treatments – EnglishProviders
Respiratory Treatments – EnglishProviders
Respiratory Treatments – SpanishProviders
Respiratory Treatments – EnglishProviders
A Provider’s Asthma Pre-Consultation ChecklistProviders
What is an Asthma Action Plan?Patients
Asthma Action Plan for Home & SchoolSchool Nurses
How Does Asthma Affect PregnancyPatients
Peter’s Perfect PipesChildren
Understanding Asthma – English VersionAdults
Understanding Asthma – Spanish Edition (Digital Download)Adults
Resources in SpanishPatients and Providers

Resources for the Last Letter E of the CDC EXHALE Strategies:
Environmental Policies or Best Practices to Reduce Asthma Triggers

Reducing asthma triggers and effective environmental policies can improve conditions where people with asthma live, work, learn and play. 

Examples of best practices include:

    • Grants to low-income residents to improve or repair their homes, such as home weatherization assistance programs. This can help to reduce asthma triggers such as mold and pests.
    • Policies that ban smoking in indoor spaces such as workplaces, restaurants, and bars.
    • Modifying the diesel engines of older school buses to reduce air pollution. 
  • Eliminating or reducing exposure to asthma triggers in the workplace.

 

Item NameAudience
Breathe Better at School (English)Patients and Providers
Breathe Better at School (Spanish)Patients and Providers
DASHH ProgramChildren on Medicaid
DASHH ProgramOlder Adults on Medicaid
DASHH ProgramThose with high-risk asthma
Cold Air and Asthma = Winter AsthmaPatients
What are the Symptoms of AsthmaPatients
Breathe Better At Home (English)Patients and Providers
Breathe Better At Home (Spanish)Patients and Providers
Indoor AIRepair at Home, School and Play (English)Patients and Providers
Indoor AIRepair at Home, School & Play (Spanish)Patients and Providers
Indoor AIRepair at Home, School & Play (Spanish)Patients and Providers
How Climate Change Affects AsthmaPatients and Providers
Spring 2021: High Risk Asthma & Allergy Season AheadPatients and Providers
Breathe Better at Work (English)Patients and Providers
Young sports minded people sitting in a gymnasium
Tween girl with woman doctor holding stethoscope to her chest and listening for asthma
Tween girl blowing dandelion seed pod into the wind. She's in a big field of grass.
Woman doctor treating tween boy for asthma with the mother in the background.